Male from Tamazula River
A male of Allodontichthys tamazulae from Tamazula River, Tuxpan drainage [Jalisco], in the aquarium of the aquaculture laboratory of the university of San Nicolás de Hidalgo [Morelia], under the care of Omar Dominguez-Dominguez. Photo by Juan Miguel Artigas Azas. determiner Juan Miguel Artigas Azas

Family
Goodeidae

Sub-family
Goodeinae

Tribe
Ilyodontini

Genus
Allodontichthys

Status
valid


Last updated on:
09-Oct-2021

Allodontichthys tamazulae Turner, 1946


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Original description as Allodontichthys tamazulae:

ZooBank:1067A98B-EE53-41BD-BF0D-D303D5AC7070.

  • Turner, Clarence L. 1946. "A contribution to the taxonomy and zoogeography of the goodeid fishes". Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan. (495):495 (ffm04518)

Conservation: Allodontichthys tamazulae is evaluated by the international union for the conservation of nature in the iucn red list of threatened species as (VU) vulnerable (2018). Pollution from a sugar cane mill near the town of Tamazula has made a portion of the former range of the species in the lower Tamazula River uninhabitable since the 1970s (Lyons et al., 2000). Additional pollution from waste water from the town of Tuxpán, and from sewage from a huge paper mill in Atenquique, wash-in of fertilizers and pesticides from ubiquitous sugar cane fields, in addition to sediment as a result of almost entire deforestation in the headwaters of the Río Atenquique (and other affluents of the Río Tuxpán), along with the Río Tuxpán itself for paper production leads to an ongoing decline in extent of occurrence, area of occupancy and quality of habitats (Köck, 2020). Recent surveys have encountered A. tamazulae at ten locations, several of which had moderately large numbers of fish, and populations appear to be stable (Lyons et al., 2019:125).